I have feels, and I understand this is where one is supposed to express them.

I have feels on:
  • James Bond
  • Hannibal
  • Mad Men
  • Comic Books
  • Crash Course
  • Downton Abbey

17th April 2014

Post reblogged from i have a bag of lesbian fiction in the basement with 4,568 notes

ladysaviours:

samanticshift:

something-cubed:

samanticshift:

like there are literally millions of people who suffer from mental illness but can’t access decent care, so every time i see someone go on a tangent about self-diagnosers i want to ask them what they think those people should do instead.

i am dead fucking serious. tell me. what do you recommend they do? because it kinda sounds like you don’t give a fuck, and that makes you an ableist, classist piece of shit.

I’m curious what you mean by “self-diagnosers”?

Personally? Something like this.

also going to a doctor doesn’t always involve a proper diagnosis. I went to my GP when I was sixteen and experiencing violent intrusive thoughts that were making me suicidal. She went “eh, sounds like anxiety, have a perscription for Effexor.” and sent me home. Two years later, when I was stabler, I did some research and discovered that my symptoms corresponded exactly to POCD, and took this information back to the GP (a different woman this time.) I told her I wanted to switch my perscription to something that was supposed to deal directly with OCD, and she said “okay, here’s a scrip for Celexa!” and sent me home. Literally the only thing the doctors did was give me medication. The actual diagnosis, I did on my own.

Yeah, I basically self-diagnosed my ADHD, and because I already had a psychiatrist for my depression (which was itself self-diagnosed unquestioned by my law school’s psychiatrist, and which turned out to be largely chronic situational depression due to having undiagnosed ADHD) I was able to get a prescription for Adderall with no real difficulty. And I’ve had insurance all my life, mental health is just a really tricky thing that you need to be in your own head to figure out.

Source: samanticshift

17th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Diane Duane with 258 notes

dduane:

dudeufugly:

The planned biopic of Ian Fleming, the man of course who created James Bond 007, has had one or two bumps over the past few years. At one stage, Duncan Jones was set to direct, until his commitment to the Warcraft movie ruled out his involvement. However, the project - based on the 2009 biography of Fleming written by Andrew Lycett - is still going. And now Benedict Cumberbatch has been linked with the lead role.
The Tracking Board reports the he’s been offered the part of Ian Fleming, although that’s still a little way away from him accepting it and things moving forward.
Matthew Brown is working on a screenplay for Fleming, with the film set to examine where he got the inspiration for James Bond from. The plan is to start shooting before the end of the year.
We’ll keep you updated…
more detailed info: The Tracking Board.

attn: @petermorwood

This madness must cease.

dduane:

dudeufugly:

The planned biopic of Ian Fleming, the man of course who created James Bond 007, has had one or two bumps over the past few years. At one stage, Duncan Jones was set to direct, until his commitment to the Warcraft movie ruled out his involvement. However, the project - based on the 2009 biography of Fleming written by Andrew Lycett - is still going. And now Benedict Cumberbatch has been linked with the lead role.

The Tracking Board reports the he’s been offered the part of Ian Fleming, although that’s still a little way away from him accepting it and things moving forward.

Matthew Brown is working on a screenplay for Fleming, with the film set to examine where he got the inspiration for James Bond from. The plan is to start shooting before the end of the year.

We’ll keep you updated…

more detailed info: The Tracking Board.

attn: @petermorwood

This madness must cease.

Tagged: benedict cumberbatchian fleminglooked like Geoffrey Rusheven when he was 20

Source: dudeufugly

17th April 2014

Post reblogged from Among other things with 4,060 notes

jokesmymomwouldlike:

are you ever just like “lol white people” but then you’re like “wait i am a white people”

Tagged: all day every day

Source: jokesmymomwouldlike

16th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from Diane Duane with 30,701 notes

Source: killthefuckinglights

16th April 2014

Link reblogged from Diane Duane with 34 notes

Justice Stevens: The five extra words that can fix the Second Amendment →

“A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms when serving in the Militia shall not be infringed.”

I’ve always thought that if you wanted to own a gun you should be required to serve in the National Guard as an unpaid volunteer. Get regular training, safety checks, occasional psych evals, maybe even be required to store your guns on the base. But this is good too.

16th April 2014

Post reblogged from Fanfiction Memes with 9,196 notes

Semi-NSFW meme — send me a pairing and a number and I’ll write you a ficlet about one

frommemetoyou:

  1. … grinding up against the other
  2. … moaning the other’s name
  3. … stripping off
  4. … sexting
  5. … giving the other a strip tease
  6. … giving a lap dance
  7. … being drenched whilst wearing white
  8. … leaping into the other’s arms
  9. … confessing a fetish
  10. … pinning the other against a wall
  11. … trying to turn the other on
  12. … successfully turning the other on
  13. … turning the other off
  14. … tying up the other
  15. … spanking the other
  16. … having some “private time” and the other accidentally walking in
  17. … having a “friend” over and the other accidentally interrupting
  18. … flashing the other
  19. having a wet dream and calling the other’s name during it
  20. … bending over seductively to pick something up for the other
  21. … leaving hickeys on the other’s neck
  22. … trying to play footsie with the other during a meeting
  23. … trying to go down on the other, under the table, during dinner

Source: frommemetoyou

16th April 2014

Post reblogged from Dedicated-to-Craig with 882 notes

imagineyouricon:

Imagine your icon having rough hot sex with you and when they climax they scream your name

Tagged: YES PLEASEUNF

Source: imagineyouricon

16th April 2014

Post reblogged from Bisexual Books with 1,170 notes

Want More Diversity in Your YA? Here’s How You Can Help

diversityinya:

Within the last few weeks, the  New York TimesEntertainment Weekly, and CNN have all published articles examining the lack of diversity in children’s and young adult literature — and next month, School Library Journal plans to publish an entire issue devoted to diversity. While all this mainstream interest in diversity is to be applauded for bringing more people into the ongoing conversation about diversity, they still largely fail to tackle the problem of how we can change the status quo.

We at Diversity in YA obviously don’t have all the answers, and we aren’t the first people to talk about these issues. This conversation has been going on for decades. What we do have are ideas for how you can change the status quo right now. If you’re an ordinary reader, you don’t have to wait to show your support for books that show the world as it is. Here are five ways you can help make positive change right now:

1. Look for diversity. 

Make a conscious effort to seek out books to read that feature characters of color, LGBT characters, and/or disabled characters. They may not be front-and-center at your local Barnes & Noble; you may have to look around a bit or go online to find them.

2. Support diversity.

Support the diverse books that are published today by buying them, by checking them out at your library, or by requesting that your library buy them.

3. Recommend diversity.

If you use Goodreads, Facebook, social media, or have a blog, talk up the books you love that happen to have diverse characters. Tell your friends! Word of mouth is still key in bringing awareness to books. And remember: You don’t need to recommend them solely for their diversity — they’re great books to enjoy, plain and simple.

4. Talk up diversity.

When discussions around diversity in literature occur online, join in the conversation if you can to express that you do want more diverse books to read and that the issue is important to you.

5. Don’t give up.

There will always be people who dismiss “diversity” as meaningless. They are the reason we must keep fighting for representation. We’re all in this together.

* * *

Want a list of diverse YA books you can get started reading right now? Here are a dozen YA books of all kinds (contemporary, fantasy, sci-fi, mystery — something for everyone!) that happen to have characters of color, LGBT characters, and/or disabled characters.

Want even more book lists? Here’s a link to all of our book lists.

This goes for all genres in all media, lbr.

Tagged: representation

Source: diversityinya

16th April 2014

Post reblogged from autostraddle.com tumblr presence with 60 notes

Social Skills or Stereotypes? What My Autism Classes Didn’t Teach Me

autostraddle:

Social Skills or Stereotypes? What My Autism Classes Didn’t Teach Me

Maggie, a 24-year-old engineer from Toronto, knew she was queer from the moment she first experienced the spark. “I had my first kiss with a girl when I was thirteen and it felt like my whole body was electrified,” she says. “It was a random drunk kiss, so I didn’t get to explore the concept further.” By the time she was fifteen years old, she was in a relationship with another girl. “It was emotional and physical, and it lasted for two years,” Maggie says. Yet she didn’t “understand or accept” her queerness until her early twenties. Why? “Because of the social skills groups that I was put into, I didn’t really realize that I could be queer.”

View On WordPress

Ugh, I’m a huge proponent of psychology and largely supportive of the establishments (APA, NIMH, etc), but the people within them need thorough sociological training on top of everything else.

16th April 2014

Question with 1 note

towonder-land asked: Hello~ Just wanted to say idk thank you?!For answering what I wrote in the sherlock post. You seem to be more into the subject.I just read a book,searched a bit but never read anything against the checklist and Dr. Hare, probably bc I wasn't looking!

Yeah, I read Jon Ronson’s The Psychopath Test (which I highly recommend it) because I was actually doing fic research for another fandom, and Ronson gets into some of the weaknesses of psychopathy as a diagnosis and the PCL-R as a diagnostic tool, and the more I thought about it on my own the more frustrated with it I got. Then I started researching personality disorders (more BPD than ASPD though) and found the conversation around them to be so much more balanced and nuanced and patient-focused. Which, aside from being really helpful for writing a character like that, is kind of what you want doctors to do.

The conversation around “psycho/sociopathy” is way more about how “these stone cold crazies will ruin your life” and less about “here are people who need help.” Saying “but they can’t be helped!” is a cop-out, especially when it’s a mental health professional saying it, and ironically strikes me as very un-empathetic (or at least un-compassionate). Now, the prognosis for ASPD isn’t much better, but at least it’s not weighted down with these words that have basically become synonymous with “serial killer”.

So anyway, that’s why it annoys me that “sociopath” is basically a meme in Sherlock fandom, and you were just one of many people commenting on that post about how it’s still a somewhat valid diagnosis— yours was just one of the more reasonable and intelligent sounding ones, and not just someone who was invested in the idea of psycho/sociopathy as a fandom thing, so I felt I could respond to it. And I’m happy to see I was right :)

Tagged: towonder landpsychopathssociopathsBBC Sherlockmental illnessdo your research